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Recommended Elective Courses

AMST 423 History of American Architecture

(Cross-listed as ARCH 473)

Course description: This is a basic introduction to the history and range of American architecture. Coverage is given to both “designed” and “vernacular” examples of buildings and surroundings, with principle emphasis on well-known American buildings. In addition to buildings and built environments of the continental U.S., the course will also discuss buildings in Hawai‘i, the Caribbean and Panama, the Philippines, and other Asian-Pacific countries and islands influenced by North American architectural traditions and practice. Both lectures and readings will emphasize the ways in which cultural identity and aspirations are expressed in architecture. It will also treat the impacts of materials and technology upon architectural forms.

Course Requirements: This course carries an oral communication focus designation (O).

Students will be required to make a significant oral contribution to the class. This will involve active discussion of readings and presentation of ideas as well as a formal oral presentation of their term paper in the context of an “architect/client” presentation. In addition, students will give two short presentations on current events in architecture. The oral communication focus will enable students to prepare for careers in architecture, planning, American Studies and other fields. Students will be encouraged to use audio and/or visual aids to assist in their presentations.

AMST 474 Preservation: Hawai‘i, Asia and the Pacific

Course description: This course is an overview of issues in conservation and historic preservation facing peoples of Hawai‘i, Asia, and the Pacific. The course covers the range of historic and cultural resources found in the region, steps taken in the past to preserve these resources and present threats to their preservation. Issues of past colonial interventions, the rights of indigenous peoples to have a say in what is preserved and how, and the means by which traditional cultures might best be saved and recognized are treated in detail throughout the course.

Course Requirements: This course carries an oral communication focus designation (O).Students will be required to make a significant oral contribution to the class. This will involve active discussion of readings and presentation of ideas as well as a formal oral presentation of their term paper. In addition, students will give two short presentations: these are a book report and a “regional report” on the geography and cultural and heritage resources of a particular region in the Asia-Pacific area. The oral communication focus will enable students to prepare for careers in tourism, heritage conservation and management, architecture, planning, American Studies and other fields. Students will be encouraged to use audio and/or visual aids to assist in their presentations.

AMST 676 Recording Historic and Cultural Resources

(Cross-listed as ARCH 676 and PLAN 676)

Course Description: The course is intended to familiarize students with the basic techniques used in the recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other cultural features. Emphasis will be on field survey methods, the compilation of inventories, and evaluations of significance and/or integrity. Students will become familiar with State of Hawai‘i’s own survey and registration process, with both inventories and methodologies for field surveys of cultural resources in other states and countries, and will also be introduced to the requirements of the National Register of Historic Places Program of the federal government. There will be further introductions to basic architectural and other historic resource descriptive terminology, methods of researching the history and contexts of historic properties, and some training in the preparation of site plans.

Course Requirements: Students will be required to complete a short preparatory exercise, either involving the compilation of research materials or a brief synopsis of research (approximately 10 pages); and to participate in a relatively extensive field exercise. As a lecture/laboratory (or studio/practicum) course, students will be expected to devote at least 3 hours a week to the field component of the project. There will also be weekly reading assignments and short exercises, several quizzes, as well as classroom presentations.

AMST 677 Historic Preservation Planning

(Cross-listed as PLAN 677)

Course Description: Local-level historic preservation, with an emphasis on historic districts, design guidelines, regulatory controls and community consensus-building. Methods and approaches in the identification and regulation of historic districts and landmarks. Taught as a combination of lectures, discussions and field exercises, the course will provide students with an understanding of how to survey historic districts, establish boundaries, draft design guidelines and write local preservation ordinances. Emphasis will be placed on legal considerations, community concerns, including the problem of displacement, and the regulatory process.

Course Requirements: The course is delivered in a combined lecture, discussion and field exercise format. Students will be expected to attend class regularly, participate in class discussions and contribute to a class project focusing on a local community. Students will be given weekly reading assignments, research tasks and field exercises. The final product will be a class report to which each student is expected to contribute. There will be also short midterm and final examinations.

Recommended Prerequisites: Historic Preservation; Survey and Theory (AmSt 675) and Recording Historic Resources (AmSt 676). Cultural Resource Management (Anth 645), History of American Architecture (AmST 623), and The American City (AmSt 627) would also be useful prior courses, but are not required.

AMST 679  Elements of Style

(Cross-listed as ARCH 679)

Course Description: The course is an in-depth examination of the manifestations, visual characteristics and social/cultural meaning of “style” in American architecture and decorative arts from the early settlement period through the present. The course covers the basic issues, such as “what is style?” (or is there such a thing as “style”?), the terminology of architectural description and the persistence of classical tradition in both architecture and furniture and furnishings. Students will be introduced to the full range of “style” terminology and also to specialized terminology for architectural and decorative components. The course will trace not only furnishings but the “assemblage” of parts, particularly for interiors through which a sense of “style” is conveyed. The course is seen as a complement to AmSt 681, American Vernacular Traditions, which treats more persistent formal characteristics of architecture. Nonetheless, the “vernacular” meanings of stylistic expression are not ignored. The course will also introduce students to some of the key architects, furniture makers, and decorators in each period, though the emphasis will remain on more anonymous expressions. One or more field trips will also be scheduled.

Course Requirements: The course combines lectures and in-class discussions with a research project/paper (see above). Students will be expected to attend class sessions and participate in discussions and question periods. Weekly reading assignments will serve as a basis for classroom discussions, so students are expected to come to class prepared. The course includes a short quiz, a mid-term exam, the research project/paper and its presentation in class, and a final exam.

AMST 680 Historic Building Technology

Course Description: History of buildings, building technologies, materials, and finishes, including construction techniques and methods of investigating older buildings, with an emphasis on North American building practices c.1600-c.1960.
Course Requirements:  The course combines lectures and in-class discussions with a research project/paper (see above). Students will be expected to attend class sessions and participate in discussions and question periods. Weekly reading assignments will serve as a basis for classroom discussions, so students are expected to come to class prepared. The course includes a short quiz, a mid-term exam, the research project/paper and its presentation in class, and a final exam

Recommended Prerequisites: Historic Preservation; Survey and Theory (AmSt 675, PLAN 675 or ARCH 628).

AMST 681 Vernacular Architecture

(Cross-listed as ARCH 650)

Course Description: The course will introduce students to a variety of American vernacular building and other cultural traditions, with an emphasis on early rural architecture and landscapes, regional traditions of the 18th and early 19th centuries, popular transformations of the late 19th century, and finally widespread building practices and other cultural expressions of the 20th century. It will cover the basic history of and current approaches to the study of vernacular architecture and cultural landscapes, provide a list of current literature, including relevant journals and periodicals, and introduce students to methods used in the study and analysis of a range of material, architectural and landscape forms.

The course combines lectures and seminars. Lectures will provide a broad overview of the field, as well as a chronological treatment of the development of American vernacular architectural forms. The seminar portion of the course will emphasize problems and approaches in vernacular architectural studies. Topics will include: diffusionism, environmental factors, and cultural factors. The “linguistic” model for analyzing vernacular forms will also be treated.

Course Requirements: Students will be expected to attend class regularly and participate in classroom discussions; write and present a 5-6 page report and a 8-10 page research paper, short midterm and final examination.

AMST 696 Preservation Field Study

Course Description:  See Summer Preservation Field Schools

AMST 697 Preservation Field Seminar

Course Description: This course provides basic knowledge of the field of historic preservation, with a particular focus on cemeteries and graveyards.  Focusing on historic graveyard and cemetery sites and structures on the islands of Oahu, Hawai‘i, the course provides participants with the fundamental knowledge of how to document, conserve and preserve both tangible and intangible cultural properties.  Specifically, this will course introduce students to the basic guidelines, standards, research methods, and documentation, preservation, and conservation techniques used in historic preservation to identify, record, conserve, and preserve historic graveyard and cemetery structures and sites.

This 2-week training will be comprised of both lecture and hands-on workshops taught by National Park Service employees Richard Miller (Exhibits Specialist, Kalaupapa National Historical Park), Jason Church (Materials Conservator, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training), and William Chapman (Professor, University of Hawai‘i Manoa and Director, Historical Preservation Program).

Workshop Information

The training will focus on

  • Understanding, grave marker condition
  • appropriate grave marker repairs
  • lime mortar materials
  • how to identify materials
  • conducting grave condition assessments
  • making appropriate treatment recommendations
  • cleaning graves
  • applying lime wash
  • demonstrations of small repairs

Location:  Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Kalaupapa, HI

Dates:  May 31 to June 10, 2016

Cost:  The tuition is free, but there is a non-refundable $130 administrative fee.  Students are also responsible for travel costs to and from Kalaupapa.

Housing:  Lodging and meals will be provided Kalaupapa National Historic Park at no charge to students.  Housing will be dormitory style with shared accommodations.

Availability:  Student space is limited to 10 participants.  Others may participate through the NPS program.  Contact Carrie Mardorf, carrie_Mardorf@nps.gov or 808-567-6802 x1700 for more information

For more information or to register for AMST 697, contact Rumi Yoshida, amstgrad@hawaii.edu or Eriza Bareng, historic@hawaii.edu or call (808) 956-8570

For additional information, call Professor Chapman: 956-8574 or wchapman@hawaii.edu