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Spring 2014

 

 

Course descriptions for SPRING 2014

Complete list of Spring 2014 AMST courses available here


AMST 150 (FGB) » America and the World

Instructor: Jeffrey Tripp

Course Description: This course examines formations of “America” in a global context, beginning with its emergence as a European colonial outpost imposed on indigenous peoples, to its emergence as an imperial and military power in the modern era. We will survey major world-historical events in which the U.S. has played key roles as well as consider the significant impacts that other world cultures have had on the American social, political, cultural and economic fabric (and vice versa). Central to the organization of this course is a consideration of race, class and gender as crucial axes for the formation of “America” and Americans.

Required Text(s):

  • Equiano, Olaudah. The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African
  • Spiegelman, Art.  Maus I: A Survivor’s Tale
  • Spiegelman, Art.  Maus II: A Survivor’s Tale
  • Stannard, David.  American Holocaust

AMST 201 (W) » Institutions and Movements (Sections 3, 4)

Instructor: Stacy Nojima

Course Description: An interdisciplinary course that examines various social institutions and social movements (ranging from the American Indian Movement, Abolitionist Movement, Hawai’i Sovereignty Movement, Feminist Movements, LGBTQ Movement, Civil Rights Movement, Asian American Movement, Environment Movement, and Disability Rights Movement). We will examine various types of materials (like court rulings, newspaper articles, scholarly writing, poetry, fiction, songs, film, etc.) and engage in the materials through debates, class discussions, essays, and other activities.  This course fulfills a writing intensive requirement.  

Course Requirements:

There will be two main essays assigned. Students will also be assigned short writing assignments, individual facilitation day(s), and presentations.

Required Text(s):

  • Reed, TV.  The Art of Protest
  • Zinn, Howard.  A People’s History of the United States: 1492-Present 
  • Online readings on Laulima

AMST 201 (W) » Institutions and Movements (Sections 1, 2)

Instructor: Jeanette Hall

Course Description: This interdisciplinary course examines diversity and changes in American values and lives in a historical context as manifested in social institutions and social movements. It introduces students to various types of primary materials (such as laws, court cases, memoirs, journals, speeches, etc.) and to different methods of reading and analyzing such materials. Using social and analytical categories such as race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality, the course examines several critical periods in U.S. history as well as situates Hawaii in the context of American experience. This course fulfills a Manoa Core humanities requirement and a writing intensive (WI) focus requirement.

Course Requirements:

Tentative and subject to change:

  • Class Participation: 30% 
  • Papers (3): 45% 
  • Weekly Blog Posts: 15% 
  • Final Presentation: 10%

Required Text(s):

  • Cisneros, Sandra.  The House on Mango Street
  • Meyer, David.  The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America
  • Morrison, Toni.  Beloved
  • Zinn, Howard.  A People’s History of the United States
  • *Additional readings will be posted on the course website

 


AMST 202 (W) » American Experience: Culture and the Arts

Instructor: Yohei Sekiguchi

Course Description: This course examines various types of American culture and arts.  It introduces students to different types of primary materials (such as novels, short stories, films, music, photography, TV dramas, cultural performances, etc.) and to diverse methods of analyzing such materials.  This class will illuminate the inseparable relationship between American culture and history: especially, we will pay attention to how the power hierarchy (gender, race, class, etc.) in a specific time period gives influence to American culture and arts.  Also, this class will focus on the theme of “home” in American culture.  How is “home” represented in each culture, and how is the significance of “home” in one culture different from others?  This class will aim to answer such questions.

Course Requirements: This is a Writing Intensive course.  Therefore, you will be assigned a substantial amount of writing and writing assignments will account for a substantial portion of your grade.

Required Text(s):

  • Twain, Mark.  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Other texts will be updated in Laulima

AMST 211 (W) » Contemporary American Domestic Issues

Instructor: Yuka Polovina

Course Description: American Studies 211 explores contemporary American domestic issues. While many topics fall under the “contemporary American domestic issues” umbrella, for this course we will look closely and critically at capitalism, environmentalism, and foodways. We will approach these topics in relation to one another and in relation to larger domestic concerns, such as social and economic inequalities. This course will draw heavily on books, films, social media, primary sources (such as government documents, advertisements, and recorded interviews), and our own personal experiences.

Rather than sitting in “lecture” this course is seminar-like, which means students are expected to discuss the reading and intellectually engage with their peers. Attendance and participation are mandatory. This course fulfills the writing intensive requirement.

Required Text(s):

  • Clements, Jeffrey.  Corporations Are Not People: Why They Have More Rights Than You Do
  • Ozeki, Ruth.  All Over Creation
  • Zehner, Ozzie.  Green Illusions: The Dirty Secrets of Environmentalism and the Future of Environmentalism
  • Additional texts on Laulima

AMST 212 (W) » Contemporary American Global Issues

Instructor: Leanne Sims

Course Description: This course explores contemporary global issues within their historical, political, economic, and cultural contexts. It will track the influence of American values and institutions in the world and the impacts and changes American society has had from globalization. Key concepts for this course will include, but will not limited to, international diplomacy, militarism, imperialism, and capitalism.

Required Text(s):

  • Chandrasekaran, Rajiv. Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraq’s Green Zone
  • Hosseini, Khaled.  The Kite Runner
  • Hosseini, Khaled.  A Thousand Splendid Suns
  • Kinzer, Stephen.  Overthrow: America’s Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq
  • Nujood, Ali.  I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced

AMST 301  » Hip Hop & American Culture

Instructor: David Goldberg

Course Description: Survey tracing hip-hop from its Afro-Carribean musical beginnings to contemporary adaptations and interpretations. Students will analyze various materials and will pay attention to the relationships between hip-hop and contemporary social forms. Pre: sophomore standing or consent. 

Required Text(s):


No books required

 


AMST 310 (O) » Japanese Americans

Instructor: Dennis M. Ogawa

Course Description: Japanese American life in Hawaii and American society at large. Historical and cultural heritage. Biographical portraits, changing family ties, ethnic lifestyle, male and female relations, local identity and the nature of island living.

Course Requirements:

  1. Oral Communication Assignments: 46%
  2. Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii Paper: 8%
  3. Quizzes: 6%
  4. Two Tests: 20%
  5. Final Examination: 20%

Required Text(s):

  • Ogawa, Dennis.  Jan Ken Po
  • Ogawa, Dennis.  Kodomo No Tame Ni
  • Various handouts (online)

AMST 318 (E) » Asian America

Instructor: Joyce Mariano

Course Description: History of selected Asian immigrant groups from the 19th century to the present. Topics include: immigration and labor history, Asian American movements, literature and cultural productions, community adaptations and identity formation. 

Required Text(s):

  • Bulosan, Carlos.  America is in the Heart: A Personal History
  • Soga, Yasutaro.  Life Behind Barbed Wire: The World War II Internment Memoirs of a Hawaii Issei

AMST 320 (E,O,H) » American Environments: Survey

Instructor: E. Greer

Course Description: Survey of social, political, and cultural relations in diverse, contemporary American environments, including: island societies,urban centers, suburbs, Indian reservations, farming communities, and national parks. Special emphasis on contemporary environmental issues in Hawai`i. 

Required Text(s):

  • Grinde, Donald & Bruce Johnson. Ecocide of Native America: Environmental Destruction of Indian Lands and Peoples

AMST 325 (E) » Religion and Law in the U.S.

Instructor: Kathleen Sands

Course Description: This course introduces students to Church-State jurisprudence in the United States, with particular attention to the difficulty of defining religion.  By studying key Supreme Court cases, students come to understand the development of church-state relations, its intrinsic dilemmas, and its application to current issues.  In the final part of the course, students work in groups to research and argue a church-state case of their choosing.  

As an Ethics focus course, this course will attend to the ethical dimensions of church-state conflicts, critically analyze the ethical frameworks within which the law has developed (e.g., the framework of individual rights), consider alternative frameworks (e.g., communitarian ethics, virtue ethics), and apply these frameworks to real situations, present and past.

Course Requirements:

  • 25% In-class exam on constitutional principles
  • 10% Individual presentation of case brief
  • 25% Seminar attendance and informed participation
  • 15% Group Church-State case presentation
  • 25% Final paper – your judicial opinion on your group’s case

Required Text(s):

  • Currie, David.  The Constitution of the United States: A Primer for the People
  • Supreme Court opinions and other sources are available online

AMST 334  (E) »  Digital America: Online Communities and Virtual Worlds 

Instructor: Sean Trundle

Course Description: Seminar on the impact of the digital revolution and virtual communities on American culture and society, with an emphasis on questions of identity and participatory democracy. Open to non-majors. Pre: one DH, DA, or DL course, sophomore standing, or consent.

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 343 (W) » American Thought and Culture: To the 20th Century

Instructor: Richard Rapson

Course Description:  Politics, family, philosophy, technology, etc.; their interrelationship with the total society. Pre-Colonial to end of Reconstruction. Pre: 150 or 201 or 202 or 211 or 212 or HIST 151 or HIST 152; or consent. (Cross-listed as HIST 373)

Required Text(s):

  • Collins, Gail.  America’s Women: Four Hundred Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates and Heriones
  • Doctorow, E.L.  Ragtime
  • Nash, Roderick.  From These Beginnings
  • Rapson, Richard.  Magical thinking and the Decline of America
  • Schlesinger, Arthur.  The Disuniting of America: Reflections on a Multicultural Society

 


AMST 344 » American Thought and Culture: 20th Century (Cross-listed as HIST 374)

Instructor: Richard Rapson

Course Description: Continuation of 343: 20th century. Pre: 150 or 201 or 202 or 211 or 212 or HIST 151 or HIST 152; or consent.

Required Text(s):

  • Collins, Gail.  When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present
  • Heilbroner, Robert.  An Inquiry into the Human Prospect
  • Nash, Roderick.  From These Beginnings
  • Rapson, Richard.  Magical Thinking and the Decline of America
  • Spiegelman, Art.  Maus: A Survivor’s Tale: My Father Bleeds History / and Here My Troubles Begin
  • Toffler.  The Third Wave

AMST 349 (O) » Contemporary American Design

Instructor: Will Temple

Course Description:  Design is an essential feature of everyday life.  Major changes in the ways we work, communicate, and produce and consume goods and services have elevated the significance of design, both as a physical artifact and as a professional occupation.  In this course we will investigate the varied ways design contributes to contemporary American culture.  We will approach these contributions from three directions: from the individuals who practice design, from the technologies that make and distribute designed products and experiences, and from the finished products and experiences themselves.  In each direction, we will situate contemporary design practices, technologies and products, within the broader social and economic forces that propel them.

Required Text(s):

  • Julier, Guy.  The Culture of Design

AMST 350 (W) » Culture and Arts in America: Survey

Instructor: Sarah Smorol

Course Description: This course is a survey that draws connections between American Culture and the art it produces.  What are the cultural markers specific to American identity? What art movements have resulted from uniquely American circumstances? This course will consider the cultural events that define various arts and art movements in contemporary times.  Topics will include: Prison Art, Alaskan Art and Culture, Art and Disability and Tattoo as a reflection of Culture- Join us!

Required Text(s):

No books required

 


AMST 353 » Indigenous Topographies

Instructor: TBA

Course Description: Examines indigenous practices born of and located in Indigenous places. Analyzes how indigenous knowledge of place informs Indigenous cultural, linguistic, intellectual, and political survivance and sovereignty, and resistance.

Required Text(s):

TBA


AMST 360 » American Cinema

Instructor: Jonna Eagle

Course Description:  American Cinema (formerly AMST 250: American Film History) explores the social and cultural development of American cinema from the origins of moving pictures to the latest blockbuster. We’ll screen popular films from a range of genres and periods–including the gangster film, the musical, film noir, melodrama, the western, and the action cinema–with particular attention to how these films work to shape understandings of contemporary social issues and identities. In addition to a knowledge of U.S. film history, students will be introduced to different approaches to the study of film, and a new critical vocabulary through which to analyze onscreen images. The course fulfills a W focus requirement.

Course Requirements: Requirements for this course include weekly film screenings, a film journal, two critical response papers, and a final exam, in addition to regular attendance and participation in class discussion.

Required Text(s):

  • Corrigan, Timothy.  A Short Guide to Writing About Film
  • Additional readings available on Laulima

 


AMST 365 » American Empire

Instructor: Suzanna Reiss

Course Description: Examines the interplay between an “American culture of empire” and the rise of the U.S. as a superpower. Topics: imperialism and political culture, social movements and international affairs, race, gender and class relations.

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 382 » Junior Seminar (Restriction: Major)

Instructor: Joyce Mariano

Course Description: Materials and methods for the study of American life and thought. For American studies majors and minors only.

Required Text(s):

  • Baldoz, Rick.  The Third Asiatic Invasion: Migration and Empire in Filipino America
  • Doss, Erika.  Memorial Mania: Public Feeling in America
  • Walker, Isaiah.  Waves of Resistance: Surfing and History in Twentieth-Century Hawaii
  • Wu, Cynthia.  Chang and Eng Reconnected: The Original Siamese Twins in American Culture

AMST 411 (O) » Japanese Americans: Research Topics

Instructor: Dennis M. Ogawa

Course Description:  Ethnic identity and Japanese media. Comparative study of American and Japanese media as related to Japanese American ethnic identity. 

Course Requirements:

  1. Final: Written/Oral: 30%
  2. Two Oral Communication Assignments (30% each=60%) (Regarding Japanese films screened in class and insights on Japanese identity)
  3. Class Discussions: 10%

Required Text(s):

Various online readings


AMST 432 (Crosslisted as History 473) (W) » Slavery and Freedom

Instructor: Elizabeth Colwill

Course Description:

The expansion of African slavery in the Americas between the 16th and 19th centuries fuelled the global economy as it stripped millions of people of their human rights; it also spawned enduring struggles for freedom. This course places the U.S. experience of slavery and freedom within a comparative frame, highlighting the cultures of opposition that arose in North America, the Caribbean, and the Afro-Latin world to challenge the conversion of persons to property.

The legacies of slavery haunt the 21st century, while debates over race and gender continue to pervade contemporary politics and society. How, we will ask, did the trans-Atlantic slave trade transform the history of the Americas? How did gender shape the experience of enslavement and pathways to freedom? How has the history of slavery been suppressed, recounted, and remembered? Drawing upon slave narratives and planter journals; trial records for witchcraft, sodomy, and insubordination; commemorative rituals, films, and prizewinning historical scholarship, this course traces stories of slavery and freedom that have shaped the modern world.

Course Requirements:

  • (30%) Concept Maps (must complete 8 of 14) on assigned reading
  •  (15%) Primary document analysis (3-4 pages)
  • (20%) Essay on the genre of the slave narrative (4-5 pages)
  •  (15%) Essay on Beloved (3-4 pages)
  • (20%) Final in-class essay examination

Required Text(s): 

  • Camp, Stephanie.  Closer to Freedom
  • Dubois and Garrigus.  Slave Revolution in the Caribbean
  • McCurry, Stephanie.  Confederate Reckoning
  • McKnight, Kathryn and Leo Garofaldo.  Afro-Latino Voices: Narratives from the Early Modern Ibero-Atlantic World
  • Morrison, Toni.  Beloved
  • Prince, Mary.  The History of Mary Prince

 


AMST 436 (W) » Gender, Justice, and Law (Cross-listed as POLS 436 and WS 436)

Instructor: Lee Ann Wang

Course Description: Exploration of landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases related to sex and gender. Topics may include sex discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, privacy, and reproductive freedom. A-F only. Pre: one of WS 151, WS 175, WS 176, WS 202, WS 360, WS 381, or consent.

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 438 » Asian Women (Cross-listed as POLS 372 and WS 462)

Instructor: Mire Koikari

Course Description: History, culture, and contemporary reality of Asian women in Asia and the U.S. Includes critical analysis of American feminist methodology and theory.

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 451 (O,W) » Popular Culture

Instructor: Sean Trundle

Course Description: Major themes, modes, and media of popular or mass culture in the U.S.; emphasis on cultural trends and social implications.

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 455 » U.S. Women’s Literature and Culture (Cross-listed as ENG 455 and WS 445)

Instructor: Elizabeth Colwill

Course Description:  This course highlights the literary production, cultural strategies, and diverse histories of women in the Americas. While the course foregrounds the voices of 20th-century women of color in the U.S., our inquiry crosses boundaries of nation, discipline, and genre to explore how intersections of race and class, slavery and colonialism, sexuality and gender have shaped women’s experiences, identities and forms of expression. Drawing upon a range of theoretical approaches, we’ll examine different genres–novels, oral traditions, poetry, short stories, film, essays, and dance–as modes of self-invention, community creation, political resistance, and historical narration. Readings include essays by Mitsuye Yamada, Chrystos, and Gloria Anzaldúa; poetry by Audre Lorde and Haunani-Kay Trask; science fiction by Octavia Butler; short stories by Sarah Lau, Fae Myenne Ng, Amy Tan; novels by Jamaica Kincaid, Linda Hogan, and Edwidge Danticat; testimonials by Rigoberta Menchu and Joy Kogawa; as well as theatre and dance performances.

Course Requirements:

  • Seminar Participation (15%)
  • Reading Quizzes (20%)
  • Two 5-6 page papers (30%)
  • Final project (35%): creative writing assignment (7 pages) with supporting analytical essay (3-4 pages), and short oral presentation of project.

Required Text(s):

  • Butler, Octavia.  Kindred
  • Danticat, Edwidge.  Breath, Eyes, Memory
  • Hansberry, Lorraine.  A Raisin in the Sun
  • Hogan, Linda.  Power: A Novel
  • Kincaid, Jamaica.  Annie John
  • Kogawa, Joy.  Obasan
  • Menchu, Rigoberta.  I, Rigoberta Menchu
  • Olsen, Tillie.  Tell Me A Riddle, Requa I, and Other Works

 


AMST 456 (W) » Art of the United States (Crosslisted as Art 472 W) 

Instructor: Joseph Stanton

Course Description: This course will examine the development of the visual arts in America from colonial to contemporary periods.  There will be an emphasis on nineteenth-century painting.

Required Text(s):

  • Hughes, Robert.  American Visions
  • A packet of photocopied articles

AMST 457 (E,W) » Museum Interpretations (Cross-listed as ART 481)

Instructor: Karen Kosasa

Course Description: This course focuses on the interpretive practices of museums and related institutions in the continental U.S., Hawai‘i, and other parts of the world. Museum exhibitions can become sites of public controversies and battles over the “politics of representation.” Individual viewers or whole communities may feel that a particular display undermines “traditional family values” or inappropriately challenges long-held beliefs about a nation’s history. Others may feel that a curator’s interpretive framework inadvertently denigrates a minority community or overlooks the importance of ethnic, racial, class, gender, or sexual differences. Thus, museum professionals must carefully consider and examine the ethical dimensions of their institutional practices. Through readings on a wide range of related subjects, brief lectures, discussions, field trips, and writing assignments, the class will engage with theoretical, historical, ethical, and practical issues. Students will develop skills to analyze interpretive programs as well as practice writing labels and developing didactic materials for visitors. The course is structured to weave back and forth between the study of three distinct but related activities: 1) the interpretation or representation of objects and phenomena by museum professionals, 2) the reception of the interpretative materials by museum visitors, and 3) the ethical implications of the interpretive materials produced by museums. Museums are dependent on staff members who combine strong conceptual, analytical, research, and writing skills, along with creative problem-solving abilities and a knowledge of the contemporary ethical issues facing the profession. Multiple opportunities to develop these skills and abilities will be available throughout the semester. Students who take this course may be inspired to work within museums in the future as professionals or volunteers; to develop projects as artists; or to participate in programs as informed visitors and patrons.

Course Requirements:

  • In-class: Learning Log Entries
  • Three 1-2 page: Interpretive Exhibition Texts 
  • Four 2 page papers: Response Papers, Interpretive Exhibition Critiques 
  • One 3 page Critical Paper (plus rewrite of this paper) 
  • One 1 page Peer Review of critical paper 
  • One 1/2 page Final Project Proposal Final Project: Development of an exhibition proposal, narrative tour, research paper or related project. This project must be well researched and related to the class material. Students are expected to submit a written proposal to initiate the project and make an oral presentation

Required Text(s):

  • Luke, Timothy. Museum Politics: Power Plays at the Exhibition. 
  • Serrell, Beverly. Exhibit Labels: An Interpretive Approach. 
  • Course Reader. (Instructions for purchasing the reader will be given in class.)

 


AMST 459 » Sports in America

Instructor: Joseph Stanton

Course Description: This course examines the development of sports in America from colonial to contemporary periods.

Required Text(s):

  • Bissinger, H.G.  Friday Night Lights
  • Finney, Ben.  Surfing: A History of the Ancient Hawaiian Sport
  • Rader, Benjamin.  American Sports
  • Stanton, Joseph.  Cardinal Points: Poems on St. Louis Cardinals Baseball

 


AMST 461 » America’s World Role

Instructor: Jeffrey Tripp

Course Description: Examination of America’s role in modern world affairs, against the background of history, perceptions, and values.

Required Text(s):

  • Friedman, George.  The Next Decade: Empire and Repulic in a Changing World
  • Hedges, Chris.  The World As It Is: Dispatches on the Myth of Human Progress
  • Johnson, Chalmers.  Dismantling the Empire
  • Klein, Naomi.  Shock Doctrine
  • LaFeber, Walter.  Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism
  • Vine, David.  Island of Shame

 


AMST 469 (E) » Homosexuality and Religion in the U.S.

Instructor: Kathleen Sands

Course Description: This seminar illuminates the role of religion in public discourse and law concerning homosexuality.  We begin by learning, in survey fashion, views of homosexuality and disputes about homosexuality in major American religious traditions.  For the remainder of the semester, we study and practice, in sequence, six different types of discourse: testimony, dialogue, debate, advocacy, negotiation, and deliberation.  By the end of the semester, students are able to deliberate about religion and sexuality based on pertinent constitutional principles of liberty, equal protection, and the non-establishment of religion.

As an Ethics (E focus) course, this seminar will be particularly attentive to the moral dimensions of these conflicts.  Although in the United States, it is ordinarily only the opponents of homoeroticism who present their concerns as moral, we will explore the moral values and frameworks operative on all sides of this conflict.

Course Requirements:

  • 20% Weekly questions and comments on assigned readings (you must post these online by 6 p.m. on the evening before class, then bring a hard copy to class and be prepared to share it).
  • 20% Online test in mid-September of introductory materials
  • 20% Active participation in seminar discussions every week.  This will include sharing your questions and observations concerning the readings, and volunteering for the discourse exercises we conduct in class– e.g., testimony, listening, dialogue

Required Text(s):

  • Corvino, John and Maggie Gallagher.  Debating Same-Sex Marraige
  • Erzen, Tanya.  Straight to Jesus: Sexual and Christian Conversations in the Ex-Gay Movement
  • Fisher, Ury and Patton.  Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
  • Floyd, Ronnie.  The Gay Agenda
  • Haidt, Jonathan.  The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided About Religion and Politics
  • Johnson, William.  A Time to Embrace: Same Gender Relationships in Religion, Law, and Politics
  • Rosenberg, Marshall.  Non-Violent Communication
 

AMST 474 (O) » Preservation: Hawaii, Asia, and the Pacific (Cross-listed as ARCH 474)

Instructor: William Chapman

Course Description: Lectures and discussions on historic preservation issues in Hawai’i, Asia, and the Pacific. Emphasis on indigenous and national expressions. Pre: junior standing or consent.

Required Text(s):

  • Tyler, Norman.  Historic Preservation: An Introduction to its History, Principles, and Practice

 


AMST 481 (W) » Senior Research Seminar (Restriction: Major)

Instructor: Mari Yoshihara

Course Description: This course guides American Studies majors to complete their senior capstone projects. Students who have designed their projects and begun their research in AMST480 will complete their research and writing that will result in an approx. 20-page paper. The course will take the students through the steps of analyzing primary sources, situating their ideas in relation to secondary sources, developing a clear and coherent thesis, organizing their ideas, and polishing their prose. We will have a series of workshops with writing exercises and peer editing as well as one-on-one consultations with the instructor. 

Course Requirements: 

Participation 20%; Draft assignments 30%; Oral presentation 10%; Final paper 40%

Required Text(s):

No books required

 


AMST 500 » Master’s Plan B/C Studies

Instructor: Vernadette Gonzalez

Course Description: Graduate students are required to register for at least one credit of work (either Directed Studies 500 or any other course) in the semester of graduation.

This course is offered as a one credit course with a mandatory grading of Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) but will not carry credit toward meeting credit requirements for the degree.

If degree requirements are fully completed, a Satisfactory grade will be issued and the student will be awarded the degree. If not, a grade of Unsatisfactory will be given and the student will be required to register again for Directed Studies 500 the following semester or until such time that the requirements are completed.

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 602 » Patterns of American Cultures

Instructor: Robert Perkinson

Course Description: American cultural origins and development. Civil war to present.

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 625 » Material Culture

Instructor: Karen Kosasa

Course Description: According to Daniel Miller, a noted material culture scholar, the field is an “undisciplined” and often quirky exploration of “stuff.”  For him, “stuff” creates us.  In other words, contrary to previous studies on the relationship between objects and people, objects do not simply represent or symbolize the complexity of human identities and activities, they constitute them.  This course will consider what this means by examining the field of material culture—its development and history, theoretical approaches, collection practices, and recent reconceptualization using cross-cultural and comparative studies.  

Through the required texts, students will be introduced to a range of theoretical approaches including semiotics, psychoanalysis, Marxism, and phenomenology.  It will be important to recognize how scholars from different disciplinary fields (Anthropology/Archaeology, Art History, American Studies, Communication, English, History, and Political Science), have mobilized theories to understand the production and meaning of material culture.

In the anthology, Sensible Objects: Colonialism, Museums and Material Culture, the authors challenge the witting and unwitting priority given to the sense of vision in previous studies of material culture.  They argue that Western ocularcentrism or visualism has been over-stated.  They advocate for utilizing a cross-cultural study of the senses to obtain a more holistic view of the role of material culture in human relations.  For these scholars objects are “sensible,” the physicality of their concrete existences are embedded in phenomenologically experienced worlds.  They also identify one of the effects of modernity and colonial practices in the control of sensory experiences “from the transformation of smell through sanitation, to the suppression of sound through the regulation of noise.”  They also note the historic suppression of the body in museums where objects from the colonies were displayed.  One author illustrates this problem by describing how the exhibitionary practices and collections guidelines in modern museums not only restricted what could be displayed, but regulated what visitors could do to understand a topic.  Hence, museum visitors were ultimately prevented from understanding the sensory importance of food—smelling, tasting, touching—at potlatch ceremonies of the Kwakwaka‘wakw in the Pacific Northwest.

Other required texts will introduce students to the field of American material culture studies, a poetic meditation on the ways everyday objects are incorporated into narratives about the world, and an important case study on the globalization of soft drinks and the creation of new forms of consumer citizenship in Papua New Guinea.  Finally, the course content will turn to the social and cultural significance of collecting practices on both personal and professional levels.  Here, contemporary consumer culture and new virtual technologies are examined for the ways they have transformed access to traditional collections, altered the role of objects in our lives, created new kinds of collection objects (e.g., “friends” via social media) and undermined canons of popular taste through the recognition of previously overlooked art/music forms circulating outside established centers or venues.

Students are encouraged to share their personal collections and obsessions, and reflect on their own collecting practices or that of others (e.g., collecting water bottle labels, second-hand suits).  Attendance at the annual Kawai Kon convention (April 4-6, 2014) may be included as a field trip option to observe and participate in exhibiting, collecting, and performance activities.

Course Requirements:

Freewrites (ungraded), 1-pg Handout (for 1-2 class discussions), 1 Research Paper (approx. 25 pages)

Required Text(s):

  • Berger, Asa.  What Objects Mean: An Intro to Material Culture
  • Edwards, Elizabeth.  Sensible Objects: Colonialism, Museums and Material Culture
  • Foster, Robert.  Coca-Globalization: Following Soft Drinks from New York to New Guinea
  • Miller, Daniel.  Stuff
  • Moist, Kevin and David Banash.  Contemporary Collecting: Objects, Practices, and the Fate of Things
  • Schlereth, Thomas.  Material Culture Studies in America: An Anthropology
  • Stewart, Susan.  On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection
  • Course Reader (a collection of essays from books and journals)

 


AMST 632 » Mass Media

Instructor: Jonna Eagle

Course Description: In this course, we will approach the topic of the mass media through a specific focus on the relationship between media and war. Looking to a variety of media from the Civil War to the present—including photography, film, print journalism, television, videogames, and the internet—we will consider how these media have worked to produce a particular imagination of war, as well as how the imperatives of warfare have shaped the evolution of the media. Issues will include the intimate relationship between technologies of perception and destruction in the modern era; the ethical implications of representing and consuming war; the status of gendered and racialized bodies in the landscape of war representation; the emergence and consolidation of the military-entertainment complex; and the changing modes of witnessing and experiencing war this complex helps to engender. While our focus will be on the United States, the impact and experience of war in other parts of the world, both historically and today, will also be considered. In addition to popular representations which participate in the dominant construction of American warfare as noble and necessary, we will consider the possibility of oppositional modes of mediated engagement with the spectacle of nationalist violence.

Course Requirements: Regular attendance and active participation; weekly critical response posts; seminar facilitation; midterm and final and/or final paper.

Required Text(s):

  • Baudrillard, Jean.  The Gulf War Did Not Take Place
  • Crane, Stephen.  The Red Badge of Courage
  • Doherty, Thomas.  Projections of War
  • Jaramillo, Deborah.  Ugly War, Pretty Package
  • Mieszkowski, Jan.  Watching War
  • Sontag, Susan.  Regarding the Pain of Others
  • Stahl, Roger.  Militainment, Inc.: War, Media, and Popular Culture
  • Virilio, Paul.  War and Cinema
  • Additional readings will be available on Laulima

 


AMST 643 » Critical Traditions in America

Instructor: David Stannard

Course Description:  This course focuses on resistance movements in American history.  During the Spring Semester of 2014 it will cover the period from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s, focusing especially on the 1960s and the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and the Antiwar Movement.

Only ten days apart, in early May of 1954, two momentous events occurred that, at the time, appeared to have nothing in common—the crushing defeat of the French military at the battle of Dien Bien Phu in Vietnam, and the finding of the US Supreme Court that racially segregated public schools are prohibited by the Constitution.  A dozen years later the conflict in Southeast Asia had become America’s war: nearly 400,000 US troops were in Vietnam, while outside the White House protestors chanted “Hey, hey, LBJ, how many kids did you kill today?”  Meanwhile, the Civil Rights Movement was becoming a struggle for Black Power: during that same summer of 1966 riots broke out in Chicago, Cleveland, Atlanta, Los Angeles, and forty more American cities.  Martin Luther King, Jr. was only the most prominent among many who saw the war abroad and racial oppression at home as innately linked in their fundamental immorality.   Less than a decade later it was over: the US had lost the war in Vietnam and the struggle for civil rights was once again being fought largely in the courts.

What had happened, and why?  Using documentary film and a wide range of reading, this course will explore those questions.  In the process we also will examine activism on a variety of related social and cultural fronts, including the rise of radical feminism, the struggle for gay rights, the Counterculture and more—along with the connections among these activities and literature, film, music, media, sports, social thought, censorship, crime, and the Supreme Court.

Course Requirements:

TBA

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 645 » Historic Preservation (Cross-listed as ANTH 645)

Instructor: S. Collins

Course Description: Federal, state, and local laws and regulations that regulate and provide protection to significant archaeological and historical resources in Hawai’i and the region. (Alt. years: spring only)

Required Text(s):

  • King, Thomas.  Cultural Resource Laws and Practice
  • King, Thomas.  Our Unprotected Heritage: Whitewashing the Destruction of Our Cultural and Natural Heritage Environment
  • King, Thomas.  Places that Count: Traditional Cultural Properties in Cultural Resource Management

 


AMST 670 » Comparative American Studies

Instructor: Mari Yoshihara

Course Description: In the founding period of American Studies, the field was dominated by intellectual history that sought to define American national character through a holistic and synthetic approach to literary and cultural texts. Such an approach came under severe criticisms in the 1960s onwards, and the core of American Studies scholarship shifted to studies of particular communities, groups, or regions. In more recent years, the “transnational turn” of American Studies has called for a broader contextualization of American society and culture, both through studying the U.S. engagement with the world and through comparative analyses of the American experience. There has also been a growing body of work that compares multiple sites and groups within the United States in order to understand how the particularities of history, environment, policy, and culture shape and are shaped by each community. This course introduces students to various approaches to American Studies that use comparison as a primary method. In addition to reading and discussing diverse scholarship that uses comparative methods, we will also discuss conceptual, methodological, and practical issues of comparative research, including: Compare what with what, and why? How do we define the research questions that are germane to all cases? How do we analyze the particularities and the generalities? How do we manage the practicalities of research in multiple archives and communities? What are the skills necessary for comparative research? 

Course Requirements: 

Class participation 30% Review essay 30% Research proposal 40%

Required Text(s):

  • George M. Frederickson, White Supremacy: A Comparative Study in American and South African History (Oxford University Press, 1982)
  • Michelle T. Moran, Colonizing Leprosy: Imperialism and the Politics of Public Health in the United States (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2007) 
  • Takashi Fujitani, Race for Empire: Koreans and Japanese and Japanese as Americans during WWII (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011) 
  • Jeremy Varon, Bringing the War Home: The Weather Underground, the Red Army Faction, and Revolutionary Violence in the Sixties and Seventies (University of California Press, 2004) 
  • Michele Lamont, Money, Morals, and Manners: The Culture of the French and the American Upper-Middle Class (University of Chicago Press, 1994) 
  • Marion Fourcade, Economists and Societies: Discipline and Profession in the United States, Britain, and France, 1890s to 1990s (Princeton University Press, 2009) 
  • Rhacel Parrenas, Servants of Globalization: Women, Migration and Domestic Work (Stanford University Press, 2001) 
  • Karin Aguilar-San Juan, Little Saigons: Staying Vietnamese in America (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009) 
  • Lynette Spillman, Nation and Commemoration: Creating National Identities in the United States and Australia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997) 
  • Sarah Corse, Nationalism and Literature: The Politics of Culture in Canada and the United States (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996)

 


AMST 676 » Recording Historic Resources (Cross-listed as ANTH 676 and PLAN 676)

Instructor: William Chapman

Course Description: Techniques in recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other resources, with an emphasis on field recordings and state and federal registration procedures.

Required Text(s):

No books required

 


AMST 685 » Museums and Education (Cross-listed as EDCS 685)

Instructor: Betty Lou Williams

Course Description: Overview of museum education including museum learning theories, informal learning programs, audience research, national and international policies and reports, and community projects. Pre: 683 (or concurrent) or consent.

Required Text(s):

  • Falk, John.  In Principle, In Practice: Museums as Learning Institutions
  • Hein, George.  Learning in the Museum
  • Hooper-Greenhill, Eilean.  Museums and Education: Purpose, Pedagogy, and Performance

 


AMST 686 » Museum Studies Practicum (Restriction: Instructor Approval)

Instructor: Karen Kosasa

Course Description: This course is designed as the final requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies. It is generally taken as the last course in the sequence of required courses for the certificate, although students may be enrolled simultaneously in the Practicum/Internship and other courses in the program. This course is restricted to “majors” in the Museums Studies Graduate Certificate Program.

The Practicum/Internship is intended to advance the student’s knowledge of the field of museum work and to provide an opportunity to research areas of special interest. Since the course is meant to be of a practical character, students are encouraged to take advantage of work-related opportunities in museums and related places (art galleries, historic sites, parks, zoos, aquariums, festivals, etc.). Students should consider new areas of exploration, or build on and consolidate projects in which they have had prior involvement. The Practicum/Internship may include research reports for non-profit organizations, research projects for museum exhibits or collections, or other similar activities.

Required Text(s):

TBA

 


AMST 695 » Historic Preservation Practicum (Restriction: Major)

Instructor: William Chapman

Course Description: The Practicum/Internship is the final requirement for the Certificate in Historic Preservation. It is restricted to “majors” in the Historic Preservation Program and is generally taken as the last course in the sequence of required courses for the certificate, although students may be enrolled simultaneously for the Practicum/Internship and other courses in the program. Students not enrolled in the program may take the Practicum/Internship as part of their other studies, with the permission of the Director, although this is not encouraged.

To enroll in AmSt 695, you must submit a practicum/internship topic and proposal to the Director for approval. Upon receipt of approval, the student will be given a special approval code for registration.

The Practicum/Internship is intended to advance the student’s knowledge of the field and to research areas of special interest. Since the project is meant to be of a practical character, students are encouraged especially to take advantage of work-related opportunities in the field. Past Practica/Internships, for example, have included research reports carried out for Cultural Resource Management firms, studies conducted for non-profit organizations, research and exhibits undertaken for museums, and results of ongoing advocacy projects. Students should view the Practicum/Internship as an opportunity to explore areas they have never had an opportunity to consider, and to build on and consolidate projects in which they have had prior involvement.

Required Text(s):

TBA