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“Explore American culture and society where the United States, Asia, and the Pacific meet. Study the American future now.”

The Hawaiian Islands are justly famed for their great natural beauty and the generosity of the native people. Less well known is the tragic history of those people in the wake of European contact and American conquest. It is a history that continues today.  During the course of more than thirty years, from the late 1960s and into the early the 21st century, Ed Greevy took thousands of photographs of the Hawaiian people and other ethnic communities in the islands as they struggled to resist the seizure of land, evictions, and further marginalization and impoverishment. With gratitude for granting us permission, we offer a number of Greevy photographs throughout the website as a counterpoint and corrective to the celebratory images for which Hawai‘i is better known. For a much larger selection of Greevy’s work, see Ed Greevy and Haunani-Kay Trask, Ku‘e: Thirty Years of Land Struggle in Hawai‘i (Honolulu: Mutual Publishing, 2004).

To view specific images used on this website by Ed Greevy and other artists, please visit the Artists’ Credits page. 

 


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